CMS Issues NGHP User Guide Version 4.5; Reaffirms that Orders Contradicting the MSP will not receive Deference

heatherCMS has updated their User Guide for Non Group Health Plans. The update is dated February 2, 2015. The only update to the guide is the following:

The updates listed below have been made to the Policy Guidance Chapter Version 4.5 of the NGHP User Guide. As indicated on prior Section 111 NGHP Town Hall teleconferences, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) continue to review reporting requirements and will post any applicable updates in the form of revisions to Alerts and the User Guide as necessary.

The following update was made to Chapter III for this release: RREs generally are not required to report liability insurance (including self-insurance) or no-fault insurance settlements, judgments, awards or other payments where the date of incident (DOI) as defined by CMS was prior to December 5, 1980. For this release, new policy language was added to the following document: “Liability Insurance (Including Self-Insurance): Exposure, Ingestion, and Implantation Issues and December 5, 1980.” (Section 6.5)

  • Any operative amended complaint (or comparable supplemental pleading) must occur prior to the date of settlement, judgment, award, or other payment and must not have the effect of improperly shifting the burden to Medicare by amending the prior complaint(s) to remove any claim for medical damages, care, items and/or services, etc.
  • Where a complaint is amended by Court Order and that Order limits Medicare’s recovery claim based on the criteria contained in this alert, CMS will defer to the Order. CMS will not defer to Orders that contradict governing MSP policy, law, or regulation.

This information was provided in a previous August 19, 2014 CMS alert; therefore, it appears that CMS has simply incorporated that alert into the User Guide. However, it is noteworthy that CMS continues to point out it will not abide by court orders that contradict MSP policy, law, or regulation. Particularly in the liability context, this could certainly cause some anxiety for settling parties since without an official LMSA process, the courts are now often times issuing orders that no LMSA obligations remain. CMS could later look upon that court order and state that the order contradicted MSP regulations.

However, there are steps that parties can take to take into account Medicare’s interests and decrease the likelihood that CMS would find that the settlement/order contradicts MSP regulations. For example, in the recent liability case Berry v. Toyota Motor Sales (click here to read our blog on this case), the plaintiff was able to obtain opinions from its treating providers that no future medical treatment related to the claim would be needed. Since CMS has stated that if a treating physician certifies in writing that no future care is needed, no LMSA would be required, CMS would not later find that the order contradicted MSP policy in this case.

The fact that CMS has continued to reiterate its policy that it will not defer to court orders that contradict MSP policies and regulations should not come as a shock, and as previously stated, if parties take proactive steps to demonstrate the protection of Medicare’s interests, CMS would likely defer to the court’s decision on the matters relative to the MSP in the court order.

The new User Guide can be found here, and the August 19, 2014 alert can be found here. For questions, please contact heather.sanderson@helioscomp.com.

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