Tag Archives: Medicare

CMS Educates the Public about ICD-10 through Instructional Videos; ICD-10 Set to go Live October 1, 2015

frankCMS has introduced two new videos on ICD-10. The videos can be found here. The videos are exceptional in explaining ICD-10 basic concepts and drives home why ICD-10 will help better communicate diagnoses in the healthcare industry than previously was available with ICD-9.

ICD-10 will not only be required by providers when billing for medical services, but additionally RREs will also have to utilize ICD-10 when reporting claims through MMSEA Section 111 to CMS. As a reminder, CMS last year issued a memorandum outlining the ICD-10 process for RREs which is set to begin October 1, 2015 (link can be found here).

Are you ready for ICD-10 implementation? MedicareConnect, our industry leading Mandatory Insurer Reporting (MIR) solution, is ahead of the curve for the October 1, 2015 ICD-10 implementation date and completely ready for the transition. Helios provides a free lookup tool which converts ICD-9 to ICD- 10 and can be found here (users can simply enter their e-mail address for access).

For more information on the ICD-10 transition or MedicareConnect, please contact Frank Fairchok, MedicareConnect Program Manager, at Frank.Fairchok@helioscomp.com.

Summary of Final Rule: Conditional Payment Appeals Process for Applicable Plans

On February 27, 2015, CMS published in the Federal Register the SMART Act Appeal Final Rule which can be located at 80 Fed. Reg. 10611. The rule can be found here and will go into effect on April 28, 2015. CMS had previously issued the Proposed Rule on this very topic on December 27, 2013. Materially, the Final Rule is effectively the same as the Proposed Rule without substantive change. While some greater strides toward more operational efficiencies could have been made in finalizing the Final Rule, Helios applauds CMS finalizing this proponent of the SMART Act within two years of the law’s enactment.

What the Final Rule does: The Final Rule puts into place a conditional payment appeals process for “applicable plans.” An applicable plan means liability insurance (including self-insurance), no-fault insurance, or a workers’ compensation law or plan. Prior to implementation of this Final Rule, applicable plans had no appeal rights with regard to conditional payment demands from Medicare. With this final rule in place, applicable plans can now appeal final conditional payment demands issued by Medicare if the applicable plan disputes the amount or liability owed.

How the Appeals Process will work: Applicable plans’ appeal rights are the same process that beneficiaries, providers and others must use to dispute a conditional payment demand. It is a four-level appeals process which requires that the applicable plan exhaust its rights in the following order: (1) reconsideration of a claim by the CMS contractor; (2) evaluation of the claim by a Qualified Independent Contractor (QIC); (3) adjudication of the dispute by an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ); (4) and lastly a review of the ALJ decision by the Department Appeals Board’s Medicare Appeals Council. It has been noted that this current four-level appeals process can take up to four years to pursue. It was requested that CMS simplify this appeals process and skip the first two levels; however, CMS declined this suggestion.

What is Not Subject to Appeal: Through the rulemaking process, industry stakeholders requested that CMS allow applicable plans to appeal issues other than the conditional payment amount. In particular, it was requested that CMS allow the applicable plan to dispute who or which entity that CMS would pursue an MSP recovery from. CMS declined this request, citing its authority within the MSP to recover from the beneficiary, the primary payer or any other entity receiving proceeds from the payment by the primary plan. Stakeholders also requested that an applicable plan be able to appeal an initial conditional payment demand, even if the final amount of the repayment was not yet available in a Final Demand letter. CMS also declined this request; Applicable Plans may only appeal from Final Demands.

Who May Appeal: It was requested that either the applicable plan or the beneficiary be able to appeal where the identified debtor is either the applicable plan or the beneficiary. CMS declined this request and has stated that the Final Rule makes appeal rights available to the identified debtor, not potential identified debtors. Therefore, applicable plans may only appeal under this process if they are the identified debtor in the Final Demand letter. Additionally, beneficiaries may only appeal under previously existing conditional payment processes if the beneficiary is the identified debtor in the Final Demand Letter.

Commenters also had requested that applicable plans be able to appoint third parties/agents as representatives in the appeals process. CMS contends that applicable plans already have this right, and further specified that the party appointing a representative must include the beneficiary’s Medicare health insurance claim number (HICN) on the appointment of representation.

Notice of Appeal: It was also requested that either the applicable plan should be copied on a recovery demand with the beneficiary as the identified debtor; or all potential debtors should be copied on all actions (that is, recovery demands, appeal requests, all notices or decisions). CMS declined this request citing that additional notice would not be necessary since only the identified debtor can appeal the Final Demand. Additionally, it would cause “an increase in administrative costs and would cause confusion in many instances, particularly where beneficiaries would receive copies of demands issued to applicable plans.”

Medicare Advantage Plan Conditional Payment Appeals: Commenters requested that the proposed rule be revised to include appeal rights for applicable plans when a Medicare Part C organization or Part D plan pursues an MSP based recovery from the applicable plan. CMS stated that the request was outside the scope of the rule and that the SMART Act provision for applicable plan appeals amended only the MSP provisions for Medicare Part A and Part B.

MSA Appeals: It was requested that the proposed rule should address appeals related to the determination of WCMSA amounts for future medicals. CMS stated that this issue is outside of the scope of the rule and that this particular issue would be addressed separately. As an aside, if CMS does create an appeals process for MSAs, it would likely be created outside of the legislative process which could allow for the appeals process to be implemented more quickly.

In summary, the Final Rule provides a much needed conditional payment appeals process for Applicable Plans. While the four-level appeals process may be rumored to be slow, Applicable Plans now have the same rights of appeal that previously only existed for others in the Medicare program. The SMART Act is continuing to steadily create a more efficient process and reform the MSP system.

CMS Issues Final Rule Establishing Conditional Payment Appeals Process Pursuant to the SMART Act

We previously had posted a blog that CMS had issued a proposed rulemaking regarding an appeals process to be utilized by applicable plans for conditional payment disputes. For background on the rulemaking and to view our prior blog, please click here.

Today, CMS issued a final rule implementing provisions of the Strengthening Medicare and Repaying Taxpayers Act (the SMART ACT), which establishes a right of appeal and formal Medicare Secondary Payer (MSP) appeals process for applicable plans, for situations where the Secretary seeks to recover payments from applicable plans. Applicable plans include liability insurance (including self-insurance), no-fault insurance, and workers’ compensation laws or plans. The SMART Act further requires that the Medicare beneficiary who received the items and/or services in question be notified of the applicable plan’s intent to appeal.

CMS has not yet published the final rule in the Federal Register. Once the final rule is published, we will provide more specific feedback and guidance on the final rule.

 

Federal Circuit Court Finds Employment Discrimination Settlement Lacking Medicare Details Binding, Leaving Parties Unprotected from MSP Viewpoint

gavel-papersOn February 11, 2015, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit published its opinion on Hoover v. New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision, Albion Correctional Facility, Sue Wojcinski, Sandra Durfee, Angie Maume, and Donna Baker, finding that if defendants considered plaintiff’s Medicare status to be critical in deciding whether to settle, they should have ascertained that status before agreeing to settle the case on November 5, 2012 for $750,000. As a result, the court affirmed the judgment of the district court, which had previously directed that judgment be entered in favor of plaintiff in the amount of $750,000 when the parties were unable to agree on the exact Medicare language in the settlement documentation.

Plaintiff commenced this employment discrimination action on November 21, 2002. After several motions for summary judgment, and several changes in attorneys, at a conference on July 9, 2012, the court scheduled jury selection and trial to commence on November 7, 2012. On the morning of November 5, 2012, two days before the trial was scheduled to commence, counsel telephoned the judge’s chambers to report that the parties had reached a settlement. That afternoon, the material terms of that settlement were placed on the record. At that time, defendants’ attorney indicated he had offered and the plaintiff had accepted $750,000 total inclusive of damages, costs and fees to settle. Defense counsel also indicated he had advised plaintiff counsel that because of new Medicare and Medicaid laws, there would be some documents that would be forthcoming to determine how to word the stipulation.

On the record, the judge asked whether the dismissal of the claims would be with prejudice in return for the payment of the settlement amount, and both counsel agreed. The judge further asked counsel to confirm the material terms of the settlement, and that although documentation needed to be executed to confirm the settlement, that the settlement would be effective November 5, 2012, notwithstanding any additional documentation which needs to be executed. Both counsel agreed. As a result, the court issued an order that same day indicating that because a settlement had been reached, the material terms of which were placed on the record, the jury trial scheduled to commence on November 7, 2012 was cancelled, as the parties would file an executed stipulation of dismissal.

After spending the better part of a year attempting to finalize the language of the settlement documentation, the parties reached an impasse. Defendants then asked the court to compel plaintiff to execute their settlement agreement, and plaintiff asked the court to compel defendants to execute her version.

On October 16, 2013, the United States District Court for the Western District of New York published its decision denying both motions and concluding instead that if the parties had not executed settlement documentation by November 8, 2013, the court would entertain a motion to enforce the settlement.

Defendants insisted that plaintiff either provide a physician’s letter stating that she would not require further treatment, or else agree to a Medicare Set-Aside (MSA), whereby a certain amount of the settlement proceeds would be set aside to pay for future medical payments, in order to protect the parties against any potential liability to Medicare. The court however ultimately found that although defendants could have conditioned the settlement on plaintiff’s providing a physician’s letter or agreeing to a MSA, they did not do so.  If defendants considered plaintiff’s Medicare status to be critical in deciding whether to settle, they should have ascertained that status before agreeing that the settlement was effective as of November 5, 2012. The court therefore ordered that if the parties had not executed settlement documentation by November 8, 2013, the court would entertain a motion to enforce the settlement.

When the parties were unable to agree on the exact language of the settlement documentation, the court directed that judgment be entered in favor of plaintiff in the amount of $750,000. The State appealed that decision. On appeal here, the Circuit Court reiterates the fact that the parties expressed a clear intent to settle and placed the material terms of their settlement on the record, with neither party making any express reservation to be bound only by writing. As a result, the court agrees with the magistrate judge that “although defendants could have conditioned the settlement on plaintiff’s providing a physician’s letter or agreeing to a Medicare set-aside, they did not do so.” “If defendants considered plaintiff’s Medicare status to be critical in deciding whether to settle, they should have ascertained that status before agreeing that the settlement was effective as of November 5, 2012.” The court therefore affirms the judgment of the district court.

We have all seen work comp and auto cases with MSP issues. And it is no longer unusual to read about medical malpractice or products liability cases with MSP issues. This however may be the first federal employment discrimination case dealing with MSP issues. More so however, this is yet another example of how waiting too long to prepare to protect Medicare’s interests in any type of settlement can end up affecting your agreement, provide you with unclear or unwanted language, or even worse, leave you unprotected from an MSP perspective. Over the last five years, there have been numerous state and federal cases concluding that despite Medicare’s guidance in workers compensation cases, and lack thereof in liability cases, courts will not disturb parties’ agreement to settle, even if it is clear both parties may be leaving the courtroom without appropriately taking Medicare’s interests into consideration. Helios can assist you with complying with MSP issues from the moment a claim is filed through settlement. Please contact us at http://www.helioscomp.com/settlement-solutions to learn more.